Home / Arts & Books / 999 What’s Your Emergency?
'A+E' Credit Reading University Typography Department

999 What’s Your Emergency?

999 what’s your emergency? A SICKNESS HAS SPREAD AND THE DOCTORS STRUGGLE TO FIND THE CURE.
No cuts no closures no privatisation. Love is good. SWELLING TWISTING TURNING BURSTING AT THE SEAMS.
Walls won’t divide us.  SAVE THE NHS.

Help us save lives this June by coming along to A+E  – Reading School of Art Finalist Degree Show launching on the 1st June. Swelling, twisting, turning, bursting at the seams; a sickness has spread and the doctors struggle to find the cure. It grows across the walls, through the cracks in the floorboards, shifting from painting to sculpture, photography to film, installation to performance. Reading School of Art welcome you down the corridors of our wartime hospital, through the double doors of A+E, an exhibition showcasing the work of final year BA and MFA students.

To help you find the cultural cure for you we have our website where our doctors are sure to have the ae2018.co.uk perfect diagnosis for your needs. As well as our talented staff we will be offering free check-ups by our ambulance team who will be on hand for any ‘drink transfusions’ and other emergencies throughout the night. If you cannot wait to see one of our doctors on the day then we have a list of several of our remedies below.

‘Love, Barbara’- Amal Idris

‘Love, Barbara’ Credit to Amal Idris Finalist Art

“I can’t remember,” says Barbara, “I just can’t remember what I am meant to be doing.” Barbara’s memories are there, but she gets stuck in the details.

What is Dementia? How does one lives with Dementia affect their loved ones? My work addresses the life of an elderly, Barbara, who lives with a decline in memory and communication.

Love, Barbara is a film-based installation. Using a double channel video inspired by John Akomfrah’s film “Purple” 2017, both film projections have the same duration and sync at the same time. Running approximately 4 minutes on loop, Love, Barbara looks at the physical effects of the ageing process, how memories can be retained through a repetitive dialogue, how one reminisces the past and how one understands the personal values that an elderly has.

‘Non Places’ – Ella Grieves

‘Non Places’ Credit to Ella Grieves Finalist Art

‘Non-Places’ exist in the cold, gloomy space of big housing schemes, industrial zones and supermarkets, and alongside the motorways that exist purely to take us to destinations of interest. This non-place invasion results in a profound alteration of awareness: something we perceive, but only in a fractional and disjointed manner. Through my practice I am de-framing what we typically choose to view through the presentation of various non-place architecture, ultimately altering their purpose and giving them significance by placing them within the gallery space.

‘The Observation Project: Series 1’ – Tomer Boulton

‘ The Observation Project: Series 1’ Credit to Tomer Boulton Finalist Art

 

‘The Observation Project: Series 1’ features four studies surrounding a disused rake suspended in a white room. For the initial application of meaning, I spent twelve hours in isolation with the readymade. Although near unbearable, the experience in hindsight confirmed that, like a Rorschach Test, a spectator is able to see personal associations reflect off the mirrored surface of vacuity. This happening was echoed in a time laps, where a monitor mounted to the back wall looped the images. Imbedded in the left wall was a speaker, giving a voice to the public whose images hung horizontally above and below. This setup was mirrored on the opposing side with studio artists. The front face was left open, allowing an audience to see themselves as the fourth study of active observers. The internalisation of junk, and the externalised meaning was aided by these pre-existing models that bridge the gap between subject and object. The point being, not just to observe, but to look at how one observes. The bridge was successful in that the audience/participants embodied the readymade with meaning and value, yet, there was no clear acknowledgment of the bridge, as it was only seen in affect.

‘indigestion sux!’ – Holly Sanford

‘indigestion sux!’ Credit to Holly Sanford Finalist Art

It will leak and gurgle into your brain, in the way that only Gaviscon will cure. Sink down your throat, through your stomach, alien to you and I will come, slither through the organs take over your mind. But I will no longer be a foreign object, I will be the most familiar feeling you know, constantly with you, aching on the back of your tongue, churning in the background. The performance by Holly Sandford narrates the anthropomorphised acidic reflux through dance, pop music and audio.

 

‘Exygen’- Ben Henshaw

‘Exgen’ Credit to Ben Henshaw Finalist Art

When an aeroplanes cabin pressure becomes uninhabitable, oxygen masks will automatically drop in front of passengers. In no less than 30 seconds, one should always put their own mask on before assisting others. This procedure in this environment can also be applied in many problems that life throws at us, in turn this concept can be a coping mechanism, a reminder and of course a rule that one can choose to adopt. Not only this can be used as a tool to divert ones path from situations that are created, it is okay to think selfishly when needed.

Oxygen masks, air vests, exit signs and seat belts can all be interpreted as consideration for safety, using these ready-mades as objects, with the function of protection. The order for the correct use of these objects are as follows: seat belt, oxygen mask, exit and air vest. However when a hostile environment is created some may irrationally confuse this order and put themselves at risk, through their own fault, from sheer panic. When cruising at high altitudes, one is in flight and is enclosed in a space of limited dimensions. Bringing this environment to the ground along with, open planned space of this piece also aims to free oneself from this confinement, being nothing more than an illusion in ones mind. Sitting comfortably in the chair and listening to the noise of their environment can be tranquil, a safe space, that can exist in ones mind and moreover be a place of exit in various situations.

Multiple exit signs dictate where safe exits are located, being grouped together in various heights and angles, along with the absence of physical doorways to follow, may create disorientation, that is, the right path to exit. However despite this gesture one should know that in any situation that presents itself an exit does exist, in any situation at any given time, and it is okay to exit or remain in the situation, but do not forget that the oxygen mask is in your reach and you should always put it on first, before helping others, else how can one help themselves if they are dead?

‘XX’ – Evie Lane

‘XX’ Credit to Evie Lane Finalist Art

Campaigning against everyday public harassment and catcalling, XX exposes misogynist perspectives and the systematic violence regarding gender constraints. Through the emphasis of voice and the exploration of an anonymous identity, XX critiques the objectifying depiction of women that is so prominently forced upon us.

 

‘Viewer’ – Lucy Harland

‘Vieweur’ Credit to Lucy Harland Finalist Psychology and Fine Art

Establishing a distinction between ‘viewing’ and ‘voyeurism’ within the contextual framework of the art exhibition.

NB: In this context, viewing can be seen as ‘an opportunity to see something, especially works of art’, whilst voyeurism is defined as ‘enjoyment from seeing the pain or distress of others’.

 

OPENING NIGHT

1 June 16:00–20:00

RSVP on Facebook here

PUBLIC VIEW

4–10 June 10:00–16:00

Free

 

A+E

 

 

 UoR_ae

 

About Manon Jones

Sports Print Editor and previously Head Of Photography 2015/2017 . Currently studying Joint Honours Art and English Literature for her final year. You can often find Manon working hard on some project or thinking up wacky ideas. When she's not bogged down with work she's a force to be reckoned with on the rugby pitch. Contact Email : sport@sparknewspaper.co.uk Facebook Group: The Spark Sport

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*