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Science & Technology

The science of being drunk

Alcohol consumption has been part of the human diet for thousands of years, and most people have experienced the effects of alcoholic beverages.Around 20% ethanol consumed is absorbed rapidly through the stomach lining after consumption, into the bloodstream, and the rest is absorbed through the small intestine and distributed throughout the entire body.Alcohol lowers the function of the central nervous system (CNS) in a concentration-dependent manner; this means there can be different levels of drunk, depending on the blood alcohol concentration (BAC).» >

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Antibiotic resistance: more of a threat than you think!

feelguide.com-Brent-Lambert

Almost everyone has taken antibiotics at some point in their lives, whether it is for that nasty bout of tonsillitis or for something more serious, but are all patients aware of the increasing resistance to such useful medicines?

Possibly the most famous case is MRSA (Methicillin Resistant StaphlococcusAureas) which in recent years has become a major threat within hospitals. As the name suggests, this particular bacterial strain has the ability to withstand some of the most effective antibiotics, allowing the infection to persist and increase the likely-hood of transmission to others.» >

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FBI takes away citizens’ rights for money & control

The FBI seized the digital black market in the vain hope to reduce recreational drug use and sales. Not only has the FBI shut down Silk Road but they have acquired 26,000 Bitcoins which are worth around $122 each making a total of around $3,172,000. This is a favourable sum of money for a government in financial crisis.

The burning question is what is going to happen to the $3,172,000 seized from Silk Road?» >

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Treasures under the sea?

The International Seabed Authority (ISA) have announced that licences for deep-sea mining can be applied for from as early as 2016, but type in “deep-sea mining petition” into google and there are countries of people who object to this.

Natural resources are not going to be available forever. This is fact. They may last throughout our lifetime, but society is guzzling these from Earth faster than the Earth can provide. Seabeds, however, are rich in minerals and “one square kilometre could meet a fifth of the world’s annual consumption of rare metals and yttrium” (phys.org, 2011).» >

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Free app of the week

Speech Enhancement Lite created by DigiPhD

This is an invaluable tool for students of speech and language therapy, acoustics, auditory processing, audio engineers, psycholinguistics, music analysis, digital signal processing and forensic linguistics. I found this app useful when studying phonetics and phonology. With this app you can record anything and it will generate a spectrogram and a short-time Fourier transform of the recording, which can then be distorted, enhanced and modified.» >

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Who is watching you online?

phys.org

Cyber crime: Internet fraud and hacking are a threat to any internet user. Although security measures are always improving their performance, such as the card reader for internet banking and Bitdefender’s safe screen when entering sensitive information online, internet criminals still keep ontop of the game.

A student from Reading University reported: “Just 2 months ago, after having a paypal account linked to the same bank account for 6 years, £485 was stolen from my bank account!» >

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Why the draft communications bill won’t perturb terrorists in the slightest. Britain’s IT contractors, though, would celebrate it

http://techliberation.com/2009/05/14/is-facebook-violating-federal-wiretapping-laws/

If you were to browse the 123-page Draft Communications Bill and search for the terms ‘proxy’, ‘VPN’, ‘bitcoin’ and ‘TOR’ you would find no results. And if you were a criminal you would breathe a sigh of relief. To give some idea of how Theresa May interprets ‘the online threat’ the bills forward states a major target is ‘the threat of crime from e-mail’. It’s as if Saddam Hussein were to prepare for ‘the threat of the horseless carriage’.» >

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The Science of fashion

Emma Bullough

As this year celebrates the 75th anniversary of the public launch of nylon, an essential constituent of hosiery, it leaves the question begging: what has science done for fashion?

Any woman will tell you what an essential part of their wardrobe tights are and we owe their existence to the scientific advance that produced nylon back in October 1938. The polymer nylon can be produced via a polycondensation reaction, where two simple monomers are combined, forming water as a by-product.» >

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